Films Showing

October 28

PRIVATE EVENT TODAY IN THEATER & COMMISSARY

PRIVATE EVENT TODAY IN THEATER & COMMISSARY

3:30pm
DIRECTOR: -
- / 360min / 35mm
We'll see you tomorrow!

All

PRIVATE EVENT TODAY IN THEATER & COMMISSARY

PRIVATE EVENT TODAY IN THEATER & COMMISSARY

DIRECTOR: -
- / 360min / 35mm
We'll see you tomorrow!
All I Desire

All I Desire

DIRECTOR: DOUGLAS SIRK
1953 / 80min / 35mm
At the end of her vaudeville career, Barbara Stanwyck’s no-longer-young chorine Naomi returns to the Wisconsin town she’d left behind a decade before—and the husband and three children that she abandoned along with it.
An Actor's Revenge

An Actor's Revenge

DIRECTOR: KON ICHIKAWA
1963 / 113min / DCP
For the grand occasion of his 300th film role star Kazuo Hasegawa revisited material that had been a hit for him back in 1935’s Yukinojō henge, here playing both Yamitaro, a cynical thief who provides a running commentary on the events of the film, and Yukitarō, a onnagata (female impersonator) in the Kabuki theater who coolly plots his revenge on the men responsible for his parents’ deaths.
All About My Mother

All About My Mother

DIRECTOR: PEDRO ALMODóVAR
1999 / 101min / 35mm
Manuela (Cecilia Roth) travels to Barcelona after the death of her teenaged son to give the news to his father, a transvestite named Lola (Toni Cantó).
The Band Wagon

The Band Wagon

DIRECTOR: VINCENTE MINNELLI
1953 / 112min / 35mm
A self-reflexive backstage musical masterwork stars Fred Astaire as Tony Hunter, an aging, out-of-fashion song-and-dance star with a marked biographical resemblance to Fred Astaire.
Lola Montes

Lola Montes

DIRECTOR: MAX OPHULS
1955 / 116min / 35mm
Perhaps the great Max Ophuls’s supreme cinematic spectacle, this Technicolor dazzler dramatizes with great panache and intelligence the life of the infamous nineteenth-century courtesan.
Dancehall Queen

Dancehall Queen

DIRECTOR: DON LETTS & RICK ELGOOD
1997 / 98min / 35mm
Shot in the heart of Kingston Jamaica. Dance Hall Queenremains a global phenomenon in Reggae culture and in its release year was the longest-running movie in Jamaica, breaking box office records.
Hail the New Puritan

Hail the New Puritan

DIRECTOR: CHARLES ATLAS
1986 / 85min / DCP
Atlas’s fauxumentary follows Scottish dance maestro Clark and his company through a fictionalized day and night of preparations for a performance of Clark’s 1984 work New Puritans, which makes extensive use of the music of the Manchester post-punk act The Fall.
Bulletproof

Bulletproof

DIRECTOR: TODD CHANDLER
2020 / 83min / DCP
Bulletproof explores the complexities of violence in schools by looking at the strategies employed to prevent it.
Perfect Blue

Perfect Blue

DIRECTOR: SATOSHI KON
1998 / 81min / DCP
Rising J-pop star Mima has quit singing to pursue a career as an actress and model, but her fans aren’t ready to see her go, and when she takes on a recurring role on a popular TV show, her handlers and collaborators suddenly begin turning up murdered.
All That Jazz

All That Jazz

DIRECTOR: BOB FOSSE
1979 / 123min / 35mm
“It’s showtime, folks!” Playing the chain-smoking, Dexedrine-and-Alka-Seltzer-popping, serially womanizing workaholic choreographer/filmmaker Joe Gideon, a perpetually black-clad Roy Scheider is the thinly-disguised alter-ego of director Fosse, whose musical film-a-clef dramatizes a bout of manic work in the mid-‘70s that nearly killed him.
Gold Diggers of 1933

Gold Diggers of 1933

DIRECTOR: MERVYN LEROY
1933 / 97min / 35mm
Opening with the jubilant jackpot fantasy of “We’re in the Money” and concluding with the torch song “Remember My Forgotten Man” (which contains the looming lyrical threat “You put a rifle in his hand”), LeRoy’s musical extravaganza embodies all of the hope and dejection of the Great Depression.
The Hero

The Hero

DIRECTOR: SATYAJIT RAY
1966 / 117min / 35mm
Bengali star Uttam Kumar draws upon his own experience of celebrity playing the role of Arindam, a well-known film actor who, unable to find a seat on a flight to Delhi where he is expected to collect an award, finds himself pinned down on the Delhi-Calcutta train by Adita (Ray favorite Sharmila Tagore), an initially hostile, sharp-tongued young journalist who, in the course of their journey and an exhaustive interview exclusive, begins to soften towards this insecurity-plagued screen idol.
Mobile Homestead

Mobile Homestead

DIRECTOR: MIKE KELLEY
2012 / 157min / DCP
In 2010, as Kelley’s homestead was slated to travel back and forth between downtown and suburbs on a circuit Michigan Avenue, he produced a trilogy of documentaries charting this intended course, documenting the economically and ethnically diverse neighborhoods and residents encountered along the route.
The Parallax View

The Parallax View

DIRECTOR: ALAN J. PAKULA
1974 / 102min / 35mm
After an ex-girlfriend comes to him with an eyewitness report on the assassination of a sitting U.S. senator at the Seattle Space Needle that contravenes the official story, anti-authoritarian investigative reporter Warren Beatty follows a thread that leads him to the shadowy Parallax Corporation, a sinister, secret right-wing organization specializing in agitprop brainwashing and political hits who will stop at nothing to retain a grip on the levers of power.
opening night

opening night

DIRECTOR: JOHN CASSAVETES
1977 / 144min / 35mm
Myrtle Gordon (Rowlands), an actress entering her Grand Dame years, is in final rehearsals for a play when a disturbed young fan is killed in front of her.
Possession

Possession

DIRECTOR: ANDRZEJ ŻUłAWSKI
1981 / 124min / DCP
Żuławski’s one-of-a-kind genre pastiche has spy Sam Neill returning to his Berlin home from a mission abroad to discover that wife Isabelle Adjani wants suddenly to split up.
Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is Calling

Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is Calling

DIRECTOR: RICHARD PRYOR
1986 / 97min / 35mm
The deep well of personal pain that was the wellspring of Pryor’s comedy is explicitly explored and exorcised in his self-reflective, warts-and-all autobiographical directorial debut, in which comedian Jo Jo Dancer (Pryor) looks back over his life from a hospital bed while recovering, as Pryor had some years before, from third-degree burns received while freebasing cocaine.
TO BE OR NOT TO BE

TO BE OR NOT TO BE

DIRECTOR: ERNST LUBITSCH
1942 / 99min / 35mm
As a general rule Ernst Lubitsch was an artist whose conception of politics began and ended in the boudoir, and To Be or Not to Be is no exception, though this fleet comedy about a Warsaw theatre troupe led by Carole Lombard and Jack Benny using their chops to fluster occupying Nazi high command is also a deeply moral protest picture.
Unfaithfully Yours

Unfaithfully Yours

DIRECTOR: PRESTON STURGES
1948 / 105min / DCP
Rossini, Wagner, and Tchaikovsky become the soundtrack to murder and suicide in Sturges’ darkly comic recital, which has symphony conductor Rex Harrison, in a role modeled on English conductor Sir Thomas Beecham, driven to elaborate musical fantasies of reproach and revenge by obsessive thoughts of wife Linda Darnell’s supposed extramarital activities.
The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum

The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum

DIRECTOR: KENJI MIZOGUCHI
1939 / 148min / 35mm
“One of the most brilliant satires of the Japanese family system,” according to scholar Joan Mellen, Mizoguchi’s masterpiece, his first film for Shochiku Studios, lays its scene in Meiji-era Tokyo, where fumbling actor Kikunosuke (Shotaro Hanayagi) breaks with his Kabuki star father to take up with low-born servant Otoku (Kakuko Mori), the only person honest with him about his artistic shortcomings.
Around a Small Mountain

Around a Small Mountain

DIRECTOR: JACQUES RIVETTE
2009 / 84min / 35mm
The sweet, uncharacteristically short swansong of the most stubbornly non-commercial of the French New Wave’s directors.
The Red Shoes

The Red Shoes

DIRECTOR: MICHAEL POWELL & EMERIC PRESSBURGER
1948 / 134min / DCP
Dancer Moira Shearer must make up her mind between domestic contentment and the vicissitudes of pursuing artistic excellence in Powell and Pressburger's brilliant backstage drama, with her "suitors" represented by young, dating composer Marius Goring and imperious impresario Anton Walbrook.
Jane B. par Agnes V.

Jane B. par Agnes V.

DIRECTOR: AGNèS VARDA
1988 / 99min / DCP
Varda’s always unexpected, inspired, and capering “imaginary biopic” of Jane Birkin, the British-born chanteuse, actress, model, and frequent Serge Gainsbourg collaborator, inspired by Birkin’s confession to the filmmaker of anxieties pertaining to her imminent 40th birthday.
Payday

Payday

DIRECTOR: DARYL DUKE
1973 / 104min / 16mm
Wallowing in everything that Nashville publicists preferred to keep off the record—the drinking, the womanizing, the fake smiles, the cheap motels, the record station payola—Payday just might be the realest movie about country music ever made.
Center Stage

Center Stage

DIRECTOR: STANLEY KWAN
1991 / 126min / DCP
Maggie Cheung passionately embodies Ruan Lingyu (1910-1935), the silent screen icon who committed suicide when hounded by privacy-invading tabloids.
The Golden Coach

The Golden Coach

DIRECTOR: JEAN RENOIR
1952 / 103min / 35mm
Prosper Mérimée’s play about a commedia dell’arte troupe touring Peru at the end of the 18th century becomes, in Renoir’s hands, a Technicolor celebration of the delicious deceits of theatrical artifice, appropriately enough, shot far from South America in Rome’s Cinecitta studios.
Tally Brown, New York

Tally Brown, New York

DIRECTOR: ROSA VON PRAUNHEIM
1979 / 97min / 16mm
The eponymous Brown, a hyper-charismatic classically trained singer with a barrelhouse blues voice who wowed audiences from Off-Broadway to gay bathhouses, finds her ideal chronicler in the person of groundbreaking queer documentarian von Praunheim.
Spettacolo

Spettacolo

DIRECTOR: CHRIS SHELLEN & JEFF MALMBERG
2017 / 91min / DCP
All the world’s a play in the little Italian hill town of Monticchiello, tucked away in an obscure corner of Tuscany, where every summer for some fifty years the residents have come together in the piazza to play themselves in the Teatro Povero (“Poor Theater”) di Monticchiello.
Volver

Volver

DIRECTOR: PEDRO ALMODóVAR
2006 / 121min / 35mm
Penélope Cruz leads a remarkable ensemble cast—the six main actresses shared a Best Actress award at Cannes in 2006—in Almodóvar’s comic drama, set in the Madrid suburbs and in the filmmaker’s native La Mancha region.
Black Girl

Black Girl

DIRECTOR: OUSMANE SEMBèNE
1966 / 65min / DCP
he first film by a Sub-Saharan African filmmaker to gain an international reputation, writer-turned-filmmaker Sembène’s feature debut gives voice to the silent suffering of Diouana (Mbissine Thérèse Diop), a black African nanny who has followed her white French employers from her nativ Senegal to the Riviera.
The Joy Luck Club

The Joy Luck Club

DIRECTOR: WAYNE WANG
1993 / 139min / DCP
Amy Tan’s bestselling novel, tracking the intergenerational passage of aspirations and expectations between four immigrant Chinese women and their American daughters, found its ideal interpreter in Wang, who lent the material an emotional grandeur, allowing every member of his peerless ensemble cast to shine in turn.
PRIVATE EVENT

PRIVATE EVENT

6:00pm6:00pm
DIRECTOR: -
- / 360min / 35mm
Due to a private event, we will have no public screenings this evening. We look forward to seeing you soon!
The Wind

The Wind

DIRECTOR: VICTOR SJöSTRöM
1928 / 95min / 35mm
The Wind stars Lillian Gish as a delicate Virginia lass who, upon going off to live on a cousin’s isolated ranch in barely civilized Sweetwater, Texas, finds herself buffeted about by the unfamiliar, tempestuous passions that the ceaseless gales and cyclones crossing the plains stir within her.
All is Forgiven

All is Forgiven

DIRECTOR: MIA HANSEN-LøVE
2007 / 105min / DCP
With her feature debut Hansen-Løve has already found her great subject: the passage of time and how it moves differently for different people, here at work in a strikingly original, deeply empathetic family drama that sidesteps all clichéd sentimentality on the way to achieving quietly devastating results.
Wendy and Lucy

Wendy and Lucy

DIRECTOR: KELLY REICHARDT
2008 / 80min / 35mm
An unsentimental portrayal of life on the fringes in the United States, following down-on-her-luck Wendy (a sublimely stoic Michelle Williams, often carrying the film alone), her pet dog, and her haggard Honda on an aimless road trip from Indiana to the Alaskan frontier.
A Tale of Winter

A Tale of Winter

DIRECTOR: ERIC ROHMER
1992 / 114min / DCP
Raising a daughter conceived during a brief but unforgettable fling 5 years earlier, hairdresser Félicie (Charlotte Véry) vacillates between two suitors while really loving neither, keeping a candle quietly burning for the father of her child.
A Brighter Summer Day

A Brighter Summer Day

DIRECTOR: EDWARD YANG
1991 / 237min / DCP
A sprawling and intimate evocation of the Taiwan of Yang’s teenage years: the outset of the 1960s, a period defined by street gang activity, the political repression of the Kuomintang military government, and the ubiquity of American pop culture.
Millennium Mambo

Millennium Mambo

DIRECTOR: HOU HSIAO-HSIEN
2001 / 119min / 35mm
A stylish and seductive submersion into the techno-scored neon nightlife of Taipei.