THEATER SCREENINGS

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Goodbye, Dragon Inn

Goodbye, Dragon Inn

DIRECTOR: TSAI MING-LIANG
2003 / 82min / DCP
The Fu-Ho Grand, a movie palace in Taipei, is closing its doors. Its valedictory screening: King Hu’s 1967 wuxia epic Dragon Inn, playing to a motley smattering of spectators, including two stars of Hu’s original opus, Miao Tien and Shih Chun, watching their younger selves with tears in their eyes.
The Confrontation

The Confrontation

DIRECTOR: MIKLóS JANCSó
1969 / 80min / DCP
Hungary, 1947: the Communist party is newly in power, and at a People’s College, the singing, dancing Red youth are arranging for a debate with Catholic seminary students that some worry will turn into all-out war.
The Red and The White

The Red and The White

DIRECTOR: MIKLóS JANCSó
1967 / 90min / DCP
Set in the heat of the Russian Civil War circa 1919, which we join in the company of a troop of Hungarian irregular volunteers stationed at the Ipatyev Monastery in Soviet territory, two of whom narrowly escape a terrible slaughter at the hands of the White guards.
Electra, My Love

Electra, My Love

DIRECTOR: MIKLóS JANCSó
1974 / 71min / DCP
Jancsó’s radically original, downright hypnotic retelling of the Ancient Greek myth against the backdrop of the puszta, Hungary’s vast, muddy plains, is among the long-take master’s most bravura stylistic performances, its 70-minute runtime made up of only twelve intricately composed shots.
The Round-Up

The Round-Up

DIRECTOR: MIKLóS JANCSó
1966 / 95min / DCP
One of Béla Tarr’s favorite films of all-time and a formative influence on his filmmaking, Jancsó’s international breakthrough lays its scene in the long, terrible aftermath of the suppressed 1848 Hungarian Revolution, as the Hapsburg crown struggles to root out the last untamed partisan dissidents, highwayman Sándor Rózsa and his band of outlaws.
Red Psalm

Red Psalm

DIRECTOR: MIKLóS JANCSó
1971 / 87min / DCP
A passion play with a distinctly socialist bent, Red Psalm recalls the harvesting strikes that brought rural Hungary to a standstill in the 1890s and the repressive carnage that followed in their aftermath, historical happenings that are given a thrumming immediacy thanks to Jancsó’s astonishing orchestration of collective choreography.
Escape From L.A.

Escape From L.A.

DIRECTOR: JOHN CARPENTER
1996 / 101min / 35mm
In this particular motion picture, Kurt Russell, in the company of Easy Rider star Peter Fonda, surfs a tsunami wave as it surges down Wilshire Boulevard, the spectacle realized by way of the crummiest VFX you’ve ever clapped eyes on.
Winter Wind

Winter Wind

DIRECTOR: MIKLóS JANCSó
1969 / 80min / DCP
A sprawling historical drama told with only thirteen remarkable sustained shots, Winter Wind takes place in 1934 as Croatian separatists, supported by Hungary, struggle to declare independence from Yugoslavia by any means necessary.
Unfaithful

Unfaithful

DIRECTOR: ADRIAN LYNE
2002 / 124min / 35mm
When a 35mm print of Unfaithful arrived at Metrograph in lieu of one of 1992’s Unlawful Entry, scheduled for our Kurt Russell series, we were understandably puzzled, but not exactly bummed out—for Lyne (Fatal Attraction) is a master of the erotic thriller, and Unfaithful is among his finest hours, so why not go ahead and thread this bad boy up?
3 WOMEN

3 WOMEN

DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
1977 / 124min / DCP
Alongside his more touted multi character panoramas, Robert Altman also had a fondness for small-scale dramas investigating the complexities of female psychology, and of these none is greater than the ineffable 3 Women, which finds Shelley Duvall, Sissy Spacek, and Janice Rule as young women thrown together at a health spa in the California desert that caters to the elderly.
The Olive Trees of Justice

The Olive Trees of Justice

DIRECTOR: JAMES BLUE
1962 / 81min / DCP
The lone fiction feature of acclaimed France-based, American-born documentarian James Blue, winner of the Critic’s Prize at Cannes in 1962, The Olive Trees of Justice follows a Frenchman of Algerian descent on a journey to visit his dying father back home, his memories of a bucolic boyhood on his family farm intermingling with the violent contemporary reality of the Algerian struggle for independence, circa 1962.
Adaptation

Adaptation

DIRECTOR: SPIKE JONZE
2002 / 114min / DCP
Tasked with writing a screenplay based on Susan Orlean’s The Orchid Thief, Charlie Kaufman embarks on a voyage to solve the myriad problems in both his art and life.
American Movie

American Movie

DIRECTOR: CHRIS SMITH
1999 / 107min / 35mm
Between 1995 and ’97, Smith stuck to Milwaukee would-be auteur Mark Borchardt, chronicling Borchardt’s efforts, with the help of his best friend, Mike Schank, to complete a short horror film, Coven.
Bicycle Thieves

Bicycle Thieves

DIRECTOR: VITTORIO DE SICA
1948 / 93min / 35mm
The single best-known work of postwar Italian neorealist cinema, with a script by the movement’s leading theoretician/philosopher, Cesare Zavattini.
WR: Mysteries of The Organism

WR: Mysteries of The Organism

DIRECTOR: DUSAN MAKAVEJEV
1971 / 85min / 35mm
A towering, controversial monument of the Yugoslav Black Wave, Makavejev’s political and sexual provocation was banned in his homeland but became an international arthouse cause célèbre.
STRANGE BEHAVIOR (aka DEAD KIDS)

STRANGE BEHAVIOR (aka DEAD KIDS)

DIRECTOR: MICHAEL LAUGHLIN
1981 / 99min / 35mm
“The high school kids in picture-perfect Galesburg, Illinois, have turned into psychopaths overnight, and it’s up to police chief Michael Murphy to figure out what’s going on, starting with the mad science department at the local university..."
Beware of a Holy Whore

Beware of a Holy Whore

DIRECTOR: RAINER WERNER FASSBINDER
1971 / 115min / 35mm
“When I first started working at Kim’s, I was in my early twenties and learning about all the great directors. I was drawn to Fassbinder because he managed to be ultra-prolific in spite of being a fuck-up..."
BROKEN BLOSSOMS

BROKEN BLOSSOMS

DIRECTOR: D. W. GRIFFITH
1919 / 90min / 35mm
Perhaps the most famous Chinese character in early American cinema was embodied by one Richard Barthelmess, cast against racial type as the lone friend of Lillian Gish’s poor wastrel, ceaselessly hounded by her bestial father in the slums of London’s Limehouse.
Sherman's March

Sherman's March

DIRECTOR: ROSS MCELWEE
1985 / 157min / 16mm
Setting out to make a film following the trail of General William Tecumseh Sherman’s pillaging of the South, director McElwee’s experience of a blindsiding breakup would redirect his movie into undiscovered territory, with the filmmaker reconceiving of it as an exhilarating memoir movie made up largely of comic-anthropological encounters with women in which McElwee’s musings on Sherman and the Civil War sit alongside his observations on life, love, loneliness, faith, and the threat of the nuclear war.
Chariots of Fire

Chariots of Fire

DIRECTOR: HUGH HUDSON
1981 / 123min / 35mm
“Chariots Of Fire came out in 1981, when I was 11, and my friends and I went to see it every Friday it was playing (not sure where our parents were)..."
The Edge of the World

The Edge of the World

DIRECTOR: MICHAEL POWELL
1937 / 72min / 35mm
“Community and cinema are familiars from way back, Powell’s first personal film reaffirmed that in 1937..."
M

M

DIRECTOR: FRITZ LANG
1931 / 99min / 35mm
Lang’s first sound film, the breakout starring role for Peter Lorre, and one of the undisputed masterpieces of prewar German cinema, in M the story of Lorre’s at-large child murderer—his bloody outings accompanied by the whistled leitmotif “In the Hall of the Mountain King,” dubbed in by Lang himself—is only one element in a larger social tapestry, a portrait of Weimar-era Berlin in which criminal behavior is discovered at every echelon, and cops and crooks are shown as mirror images of one another.
Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters

Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters

DIRECTOR: PAUL SCHRADER
1985 / 121min / DCP
Self-destruction and the (particularly masculine) death drive have been constants in Schrader’s filmography, so it’s only natural that he would be attracted to the story of Yukio Mishima, the renegade/ultra-traditionalist Japanese artist who lived his life as an artwork, with his seppuku his final masterstroke.
Diary of a Teenage Girl

Diary of a Teenage Girl

DIRECTOR: MARIELLE HELLER
2015 / 102min / DCP
Phoebe Gloeckner’s semi-autobiographical graphic novel Diary of a Teenage Girl, first published to acclaim in 2002, was first adapted for the stage by Marielle Heller, then brought to the screen with an exceptional Bel Powley in the role of Minnie Goetze, a 15-year-old aspiring cartoonist in 1979 San Francisco who begins a tumultuous affair with a much older man (Alexander Skarsgård) who, rather inconveniently, is the boyfriend of her mother (Kristen Wiig).
A Bigger Splash

A Bigger Splash

DIRECTOR: LUCA GUADAGNINO
2015 / 125min / DCP
Reunited with the star of his 2009 I Am Love, Tilda Swinton, Guadagnino produced this tense, elegant sun-splashed psychological drama inspired by Jacques Deray’s 1969 La Piscine and the work of David Hockney. It’s head games a-plenty at an isolated villa on a Sicilian island where Swinton’s celebrity rocker has holed away with her troubled lover, Paul (Matthias Schoenaerts), rendered mute by recent surgery, and her old flame, Harry (Ralph Fiennes), who’s barged onto the scene with a previously unknown daughter (Dakota Johnson) in tow, as well as mysterious motives.
Crumb

Crumb

DIRECTOR: TERRY ZWIGOFF
1994 / 119min / 35mm
Robert “R.” Crumb’s work as the breakout star of the underground comix scene was plenty well known before the appearance of this intimate, deeply melancholy documentary, but Zwigoff’s film revealed the deep well of pain and family dysfunction that Crumb’s work draws from.