THEATER SCREENINGS

NOW PLAYING

Diary of a Teenage Girl

Diary of a Teenage Girl

DIRECTOR: MARIELLE HELLER
2015 / 102min / DCP
Phoebe Gloeckner’s semi-autobiographical graphic novel Diary of a Teenage Girl, first published to acclaim in 2002, was first adapted for the stage by Marielle Heller, then brought to the screen with an exceptional Bel Powley in the role of Minnie Goetze, a 15-year-old aspiring cartoonist in 1979 San Francisco who begins a tumultuous affair with a much older man (Alexander Skarsgård) who, rather inconveniently, is the boyfriend of her mother (Kristen Wiig).
Red Psalm

Red Psalm

DIRECTOR: MIKLóS JANCSó
1971 / 87min / DCP
A passion play with a distinctly socialist bent, Red Psalm recalls the harvesting strikes that brought rural Hungary to a standstill in the 1890s and the repressive carnage that followed in their aftermath, historical happenings that are given a thrumming immediacy thanks to Jancsó’s astonishing orchestration of collective choreography.
American Movie

American Movie

DIRECTOR: CHRIS SMITH
1999 / 107min / 35mm
Between 1995 and ’97, Smith stuck to Milwaukee would-be auteur Mark Borchardt, chronicling Borchardt’s efforts, with the help of his best friend, Mike Schank, to complete a short horror film, Coven.
The Edge of the World

The Edge of the World

DIRECTOR: MICHAEL POWELL
1937 / 72min / 35mm
“Community and cinema are familiars from way back, Powell’s first personal film reaffirmed that in 1937..."
Beware of a Holy Whore

Beware of a Holy Whore

DIRECTOR: RAINER WERNER FASSBINDER
1971 / 115min / 35mm
“When I first started working at Kim’s, I was in my early twenties and learning about all the great directors. I was drawn to Fassbinder because he managed to be ultra-prolific in spite of being a fuck-up..."
The Olive Trees of Justice

The Olive Trees of Justice

DIRECTOR: JAMES BLUE
1962 / 81min / DCP
The lone fiction feature of acclaimed France-based, American-born documentarian James Blue, winner of the Critic’s Prize at Cannes in 1962, The Olive Trees of Justice follows a Frenchman of Algerian descent on a journey to visit his dying father back home, his memories of a bucolic boyhood on his family farm intermingling with the violent contemporary reality of the Algerian struggle for independence, circa 1962.
3 WOMEN

3 WOMEN

DIRECTOR: ROBERT ALTMAN
1977 / 124min / DCP
Alongside his more touted multi character panoramas, Robert Altman also had a fondness for small-scale dramas investigating the complexities of female psychology, and of these none is greater than the ineffable 3 Women, which finds Shelley Duvall, Sissy Spacek, and Janice Rule as young women thrown together at a health spa in the California desert that caters to the elderly.
WR: Mysteries of The Organism

WR: Mysteries of The Organism

DIRECTOR: DUSAN MAKAVEJEV
1971 / 85min / 35mm
A towering, controversial monument of the Yugoslav Black Wave, Makavejev’s political and sexual provocation was banned in his homeland but became an international arthouse cause célèbre.
Adaptation

Adaptation

DIRECTOR: SPIKE JONZE
2002 / 114min / DCP
Tasked with writing a screenplay based on Susan Orlean’s The Orchid Thief, Charlie Kaufman embarks on a voyage to solve the myriad problems in both his art and life.
Electra, My Love

Electra, My Love

DIRECTOR: MIKLóS JANCSó
1974 / 71min / DCP
Jancsó’s radically original, downright hypnotic retelling of the Ancient Greek myth against the backdrop of the puszta, Hungary’s vast, muddy plains, is among the long-take master’s most bravura stylistic performances, its 70-minute runtime made up of only twelve intricately composed shots.
Chariots of Fire

Chariots of Fire

DIRECTOR: HUGH HUDSON
1981 / 123min / 35mm
“Chariots Of Fire came out in 1981, when I was 11, and my friends and I went to see it every Friday it was playing (not sure where our parents were)..."
A Bigger Splash

A Bigger Splash

DIRECTOR: LUCA GUADAGNINO
2015 / 125min / DCP
Reunited with the star of his 2009 I Am Love, Tilda Swinton, Guadagnino produced this tense, elegant sun-splashed psychological drama inspired by Jacques Deray’s 1969 La Piscine and the work of David Hockney. It’s head games a-plenty at an isolated villa on a Sicilian island where Swinton’s celebrity rocker has holed away with her troubled lover, Paul (Matthias Schoenaerts), rendered mute by recent surgery, and her old flame, Harry (Ralph Fiennes), who’s barged onto the scene with a previously unknown daughter (Dakota Johnson) in tow, as well as mysterious motives.
BROKEN BLOSSOMS

BROKEN BLOSSOMS

DIRECTOR: D. W. GRIFFITH
1919 / 90min / DCP
Perhaps the most famous Chinese character in early American cinema was embodied by one Richard Barthelmess, cast against racial type as the lone friend of Lillian Gish’s poor wastrel, ceaselessly hounded by her bestial father in the slums of London’s Limehouse.
Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters

Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters

DIRECTOR: PAUL SCHRADER
1985 / 121min / DCP
Self-destruction and the (particularly masculine) death drive have been constants in Schrader’s filmography, so it’s only natural that he would be attracted to the story of Yukio Mishima, the renegade/ultra-traditionalist Japanese artist who lived his life as an artwork, with his seppuku his final masterstroke.
The Round-Up

The Round-Up

DIRECTOR: MIKLóS JANCSó
1966 / 95min / DCP
One of Béla Tarr’s favorite films of all-time and a formative influence on his filmmaking, Jancsó’s international breakthrough lays its scene in the long, terrible aftermath of the suppressed 1848 Hungarian Revolution, as the Hapsburg crown struggles to root out the last untamed partisan dissidents, highwayman Sándor Rózsa and his band of outlaws.
Crumb

Crumb

DIRECTOR: TERRY ZWIGOFF
1994 / 119min / 35mm
Robert “R.” Crumb’s work as the breakout star of the underground comix scene was plenty well known before the appearance of this intimate, deeply melancholy documentary, but Zwigoff’s film revealed the deep well of pain and family dysfunction that Crumb’s work draws from.
Sherman's March

Sherman's March

DIRECTOR: ROSS MCELWEE
1985 / 157min / 16mm
Setting out to make a film following the trail of General William Tecumseh Sherman’s pillaging of the South, director McElwee’s experience of a blindsiding breakup would redirect his movie into undiscovered territory, with the filmmaker reconceiving of it as an exhilarating memoir movie made up largely of comic-anthropological encounters with women in which McElwee’s musings on Sherman and the Civil War sit alongside his observations on life, love, loneliness, faith, and the threat of the nuclear war.
THE THING

THE THING

DIRECTOR: JOHN CARPENTER
1982 / 109min / DCP
CGI can summon up ethereal outerworlds and endless untold marvels, but mere pixels can never create the viscous, loathsome ickiness of Carpenter’s unnerving, slithery remake of Christian Nyby and Howard Hawks’s 1951 science fiction classic of the same name.
Futura

Futura

DIRECTOR: PIETRO MARCELLO, FRANCESCO MUNZI, ALICE ROHRWACHER
2021 / 105min / DCP
The work of a triumvirate of Italian cinema’s leading lights—Marcello (Martin Eden), Munzi (Black Souls), and Rohrwacher (Happy as Lazzaro)—Futura is a unique collective work, comprised of a series of interviews with boys and girls in their late teens collected during a series of journey across Italy, taken before and after pandemic and lockdown.
Inquiring Nuns

Inquiring Nuns

DIRECTOR: GORDON QUINN, JERRY TEMANER
1968 / 66min / DCP
Quinn and Temaner, two of the founders of the Chicago documentary cooperative Kartemquin Films who’d been profoundly inspired by Edgar Morin and Jean Rouch’s 1961 Chronicle of a Summer, enlisted two young nuns to hit the city streets in the turbulent year of ’68 and pose a question to the men and women that they’d meet: “Are you happy?”
Wildwood, NJ

Wildwood, NJ

DIRECTOR: CAROL WEAKS CASSIDY, RUTH LEITMAN
1994 / 60min / DCP
A favorite film of none other than Lana Del Ray, who slipped excerpts from it into her (since pulled for copyright reasons) music video for “Diet Mountain Dew,” Leitman and Cassidy’s legendary documentary is a Super 8 time capsule of the Jersey Shore in High ‘90s fashions, focusing specifically at the women—from adolescence to retirement age—who flock to the titular beach town to flirt, frolic with friends, or just take the sea air.
I'm Not There

I'm Not There

DIRECTOR: TODD HAYNES
2007 / 135min / 35mm
Like a true Bob Dylan fan, Haynes understood that no paint-by-numbers biopic would capture Dylan’s wily, elusive, trickster spirit, and so in anti-biopic I’m Not There he gives us, quite literally, a multitude of shifting Dylan surrogates.
Chronicle of a Summer

Chronicle of a Summer

DIRECTOR: JEAN ROUCH, EDGAR MORIN
1961 / 90min / 16mm
Jean Rouch, working in Africa, had already reinvented the ethnographic documentary with a radical approach that invited subjects to participate in the filmmaking process when he was approached by sociologist Edgar Morin with another radical idea: making an ethnographic film about Paris, the place where they lived, by asking a cross-section of Parisians the same question: “Are you happy?”
Goodbye, Dragon Inn

Goodbye, Dragon Inn

DIRECTOR: TSAI MING-LIANG
2003 / 82min / DCP
The Fu-Ho Grand, a movie palace in Taipei, is closing its doors. Its valedictory screening: King Hu’s 1967 wuxia epic Dragon Inn, playing to a motley smattering of spectators, including two stars of Hu’s original opus, Miao Tien and Shih Chun, watching their younger selves with tears in their eyes.
The Short List

The Short List

DIRECTOR: EVE LIU, FRANCESCA DE FUSCO, CONSTANCE TSANG, LIVIA HUANG, ZAMARIN WAHDAT, MOLLY GILLIS
2022 / 101min / DCP
Metrograph and The Department of Motion Pictures present “The Short List,” a collection of the finest short films from the past year curated by Emily May Jampel.
Songs for Drella

Songs for Drella

DIRECTOR: ED LACHMAN
1990 / 55min / 35mm
Performing together on-stage for the first time since 1968, Lou Reed and John Cale perform a 15-song biography of a departed friend, foil, and collaborator. “Drella,” a portmanteau of “Dracula” and “Cinderella,” is an old nickname for their subject, Andy Warhol, dead for three years when Lachman filmed this performance, by turns a fond and cutting send-off featuring Reed on guitar and lead vocals, and Cale on electric viola and keyboards.
The Velvet Underground

The Velvet Underground

DIRECTOR: TODD HAYNES
2021 / 121min / DCP
Made up of astonishing archival footage and original interviews with surviving band members Maureen Tucker, John Cale, and Doug Yule, Haynes’s The Velvet Underground tells the story of the greatest cult band of the 20th century; the group who, in Brian Eno’s famous formulation, only sold 30,000 copies of their first album, but “everyone who bought one of those 30,000 copies went out and started a band.”
Todd Haynes Surprise Screening

Todd Haynes Surprise Screening

DIRECTOR: TODD HAYNES
2022 / 81min / DCP
Think of it like the “Secret Show” in our Haynes music movies series—we give you the location, you show up and see what happens. We promise you won’t be disappointed by the superstar headliner.
The Red and The White

The Red and The White

DIRECTOR: MIKLóS JANCSó
1967 / 90min / DCP
Set in the heat of the Russian Civil War circa 1919, which we join in the company of a troop of Hungarian irregular volunteers stationed at the Ipatyev Monastery in Soviet territory, two of whom narrowly escape a terrible slaughter at the hands of the White guards.
LE JOLI MAI

LE JOLI MAI

DIRECTOR: CHRIS MARKER AND PIERRE LHOMME
1963 / 145min / DCP
A snapshot of Paris in the spring of 1962, in the aftermath of the ceasefire with Algeria, Marker’s lyric, spirited, and enormously generous city symphony looks at the lives of a broad cross section of Parisians.
Winter Wind

Winter Wind

DIRECTOR: MIKLóS JANCSó
1969 / 80min / DCP
A sprawling historical drama told with only thirteen remarkable sustained shots, Winter Wind takes place in 1934 as Croatian separatists, supported by Hungary, struggle to declare independence from Yugoslavia by any means necessary.
Taxi Tehran

Taxi Tehran

DIRECTOR: JAFAR PANAHI
2015 / 82min / DCP
Panahi directs and stars in this docufiction miracle, which finds him posing as a share taxi driver in Tehran who, rather than demanding cash payment from customers for his services, asks only to hear something about their lives.
Zola

Zola

DIRECTOR: JANICZA BRAVO
2021 / 87min / DCP
Zola (newcomer Taylour Paige), a Detroit waitress, strikes up a new friendship with a customer, Stefani (Riley Keough), who seduces her to join a weekend of dancing and partying in Florida.
The Giverny Document (Single Channel)

The Giverny Document (Single Channel)

DIRECTOR: JA'TOVIA GARY
2019 / 60min / DCP
Combining footage shot in Harlem and Claude Monet’s famous gardens in Giverny, France, Gary employs a dizzying array of cinematic techniques—including animations overlaid on archival film and spontaneous woman-to-woman street interviews—in her coruscating contemplation of Black female performers, examining both their triumphs and the mournful history of their exploitation and commodification.
MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION

MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION

DIRECTOR: JOHN M. STAHL
1935 / 112min / 35mm
Tragedy comes in twos to the life of Robert Merrick (Robert Taylor), a spoiled scion of wealth who is first indirectly responsible for the death of a famous surgeon, then for the blinding of the surgeon’s grieving widow, Helen (Irene Dunne).
Leave Her To Heaven

Leave Her To Heaven

DIRECTOR: JOHN M. STAHL
1945 / 110min / DCP
After spending much of the ’30s on narratives of self-sacrificing women, Stahl gave audiences a force of feminine vengeance to be reckoned with in the form of Gene Tierney’s wrathfully jealous Ellen Berent.
THE KEYS OF THE KINGDOM

THE KEYS OF THE KINGDOM

DIRECTOR: JOHN M. STAHL
1944 / 137min / DCP
Gregory Peck earned an early Academy Award nomination for his performance as Scottish-born Father Francis Chisholm, a Catholic missionary in remotest China who converts through compassion rather than bribery.
BIX: Ain't None of them Play Like Him Yet

BIX: Ain't None of them Play Like Him Yet

DIRECTOR: BRIGITTE BERMAN
1981 / 116min / DCP
Composer and performer Leon “Bix” Beiderbecke, considered by many the greatest jazz cornet player of all time, received a curtain call worthy of his genius 50 years after his 1931 death in Bix: Ain’t None of them Play Like Him Yet.
The Confrontation

The Confrontation

DIRECTOR: MIKLóS JANCSó
1969 / 80min / DCP
Hungary, 1947: the Communist party is newly in power, and at a People’s College, the singing, dancing Red youth are arranging for a debate with Catholic seminary students that some worry will turn into all-out war.
When Tomorrow Comes

When Tomorrow Comes

DIRECTOR: JOHN M. STAHL
1939 / 90min / 35mm
A flirtation between posh concert pianist Philip (Charles Boyer) and working-class waitress Helen (Irene Dunne) turns serious when they’re caught in a hurricane on a driving date near his Long Island manse, but still greater storms lie ahead, for Philip had forgotten to mention the fact that he is unhappily married.
HOLY MATRIMONY

HOLY MATRIMONY

DIRECTOR: JOHN M. STAHL
1943 / 87min / 35mm
Returning to his native England in 1905 to be knighted after a long tropical exile, publicity-averse painter Priam Farll (Monty Woolley) prankishly swaps identities with his recently deceased valet, Leek.
All Divided Selves

All Divided Selves

DIRECTOR: LUKE FOWLER
2011 / 93min / DCP
In this coruscating, tightly packed cinematic collage, a nominee for the 2012 Turner Prize, Fowler recounts the life and legend of Glasgow-born psychiatrist-cum-guru R.D. Laing.
HELL FROZEN OVER + GET RID OF YOURSELF

HELL FROZEN OVER + GET RID OF YOURSELF

DIRECTOR: BERNADETTE CORPORATION
2000, 2002 / 80min / DCP
Formed in 1994, Bernadette Corporation is a multi-hyphenate, international, and anonymous art collective whose feverish output resists pat categorization.
Only Yesterday

Only Yesterday

DIRECTOR: JOHN M. STAHL
1933 / 105min / 35mm
Sourced from Stefan Zweig’s (uncredited) Letter from an Unknown Woman, later adapted by Max Öphuls, Stahl’s film transfers the action from Vienna to New York City where, on the eve of the 1929 Crash, ruined and suicidal stockbroker Jim (John Boles) is recalled to an old affair by a letter from a girl, Mary, whom he’d deflowered years ago on the eve of his departure for the World War I.
Imitation of Life

Imitation of Life

DIRECTOR: JOHN M. STAHL
1934 / 111min / 35mm
Stahl’s films return time and again to the subject of female sacrifice, often treated with an intriguing ambivalence, and his adaptation of the Fannie Hurst bestseller adds the dimension of race to his great theme, depicting the symbiotic-but-lopsided relationship between entrepreneur Claudette Colbert and her Black business partner/housekeeper, Louise Beavers’ “Aunt” Delilah.
Back Street

Back Street

DIRECTOR: JOHN M. STAHL
1932 / 93min / 35mm
The first, and indisputably, greatest of three screen adaptations of Fannie Hurst’s novel of the same name, with emotional depths and a pre-Code sexual candor absent from later versions.
Luke Fowler Shorts Program

Luke Fowler Shorts Program

DIRECTOR: LUKE FOWLER
68min / 16mm
A program of Fowler’s portraits of places, including several reflecting absent human subjects.
A Grammar for Listening (Parts 1-3)

A Grammar for Listening (Parts 1-3)

DIRECTOR: LUKE FOWLER
2009 / 58min / 16mm
Always an unusually acoustically minded filmmaker, Fowler investigates the complicated relationship between looking and listening in this three-part film cycle, made in collaboration with composer Éric La Casa, musician Toshiya Tsunoda, and sound artist Lee Patterson, whose work includes extensive recordings of underwater life made through use of hydrophones
Seed

Seed

DIRECTOR: JOHN M. STAHL
1931 / 96min / 35mm
Would-be writer Bart (John Boles) has had his literary ambitions all but smothered by the duties of fatherhood when along comes old flame Mildred (Genevieve Tobin), who strokes his deflated ego and offers him a chance to finish his Great American Novel in her swanky art deco duplex, away from wife Peggy (Lois Wilson).